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National Standards
 

History Standards

Selected National History Standards
Developed with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the U.S. Department of Education
CAMP SILOS MODULES
Module 1:
Exploring the Prairie
Module 2:
Pioneer Farming
Module 3:
The Story of Corn
Module 4:
Farming Today and Tomorrow

The K-4 history standards to which this project is most closely aligned include standard 3 within topic 2 - the history of studentsí own state or region.

Standard 3A: The student understands the history of indigenous peoples who first lived in his or her state or region.

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Standard 3B: The student understands the history of the first European, African and/or Asian-Pacific explorers and settlers who came to his or her state or region.

 

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Standard 3C: The student understands the various other groups from regions throughout the world who came into the his or her own state or region over the long-ago and recent past.

 

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Standard 3D The student understands the interactions among all these groups throughout the history of his or her state.

 

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Standard 3E The student understands the ideas that were significant in the development of the state and that helped to forge its unique identity.

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The history standards for grades 5-12 for which this project is most closely aligned include Chapter 3 - United States History.

Era 1: Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)

Standard 2: How early European exploration and colonization resulted in cultural and ecological interactions among previously unconnected peoples.

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Era 4: Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)

Standard 1: United States territorial expansion between 1801 and 1861, and how it affected relations with external powers and Native Americans.

 

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Era 6: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900)

Standard 1: How the rise of corporations, heavy industry, and mechanized farming transformed the American people.

 

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Era 7: The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)

Standard 3: How the United States changed from the end of World War I to the eve of the Great Depression.

     

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Era 10: Contemporary United States (1968-present)

Standard 2: Economic, social, and cultural developments in contemporary United States.

     

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Science Standards

Selected National Science Standards
CAMP SILOS MODULES
Module 1:
Exploring the Prairie
Module 2:
Pioneer Farming
Module 3:
The Story of Corn
Module 4:
Farming Today and Tomorrow
Standard 2: Understands basic Earth processes.

Grades 3-5: Knows the composition and properties of soils (e.g., components of soil such as weathered rock, living organisms, products of plants and animals; properties of soil such as color, texture, capacity to retain water, ability to support plant growth).

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Grades 3-5: Knows how features on the Earth's surface are constantly changed by a combination of slow and rapid processes (e.g., weathering, erosion, and deposition of sediment caused by waves, wind, water, and ice; sudden changes in the landscape caused by landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes).

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Grades 6-8: Knows components of soil and other factors that influence soil texture, fertility, and resistance to erosion (e.g., plant roots and debris, bacteria, fungi, worms, rodents).

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Grades 6-8: Knows how land forms are created through a combination of constructive and destructive forces (e.g., constructive forces such as crustal deformation, volcanic eruptions, and deposition of sediment; destructive forces such as weathering and erosion).

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Standard 7: Understands how species depend on one another and on the environment for survival.

Grades 3-5: Knows that an organism's patterns of behavior are related to the nature of that organism's environment (e.g., kinds and numbers of other organisms present, availability of food and resources, physical characteristics of the environment).

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Grades 3-5: Knows that changes in the environment can have different effects on different (e.g., some organisms move in, others move out; some organisms survive and reproduce, others die).

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Grades 3-5: Knows that all organisms (including humans) cause changes in their environments, and these changes can be beneficial or detrimental.

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Grades 6-8: Knows ways in which species interact and depend on one another in an ecosystem (e.g., producer/consumer, predator/prey, parasite/host, relationships that are mutually beneficial or competitive).

 

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Grades 6-8: Knows factors that affect the number and types of organisms an ecosystem can support (e.g., available resources; abiotic factors such as quantity of light and water, range of temperatures, and soil composition; disease; competition from other organisms within the ecosystem; predation).

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Grades 6-8: Knows relationships that exist among organisms in food chains and food webs.

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Technology Standards

Selected National Technology Standards
Developed by the International Society for Technology in Education
CAMP SILOS MODULES
Module 1:
Exploring the Prairie
Module 2:
Pioneer Farming
Module 3:
The Story of Corn
Module 4:
Farming Today and Tomorrow

Standard 1: Basic operations and concepts

  • Students demonstrate a sound understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems.
  • Students are proficient in the use of technology.

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Standard 2: Social, ethical, and human issues

  • Students understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology.
  • Students practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software.
  • Students develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

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Standard 3: Technology productivity tools

  • Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
  • Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works.

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Standard 4: Technology communications tools

  • Students use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.
  • Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences.

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Standard 5: Technology research tools

  • Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources.
  • Students use technology tools to process data and report results.
  • Students evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.

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Standard 6: Technology problem-solving and decision-making tools

  • Students use technology resources for solving problems and making informed decisions.
  • Students employ technology in the development of strategies for solving problems in the real world.

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Information Literacy Standards

Selected Information Literacy Standards
Developed by the the American Library Association and Association for Educational Communications and Technology
CAMP SILOS MODULES
Module 1:
Exploring the Prairie
Module 2:
Pioneer Farming
Module 3:
The Story of Corn
Module 4:
Farming Today and Tomorrow

Standard 1: The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.

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Standard 2: The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.

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Standard 3: The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.

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Standard 8: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology.

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Standard 9: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.

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Language Arts Standards

Selected Language Arts Standards
Developed by the Mid-content Research for Education and Learning
CAMP SILOS MODULES
Module 1:
Exploring the Prairie
Module 2:
Pioneer Farming
Module 3:
The Story of Corn
Module 4:
Farming Today and Tomorrow
Reading

Previews text (e.g., skims material; uses pictures, textual clues, and text format)

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Establishes and adjusts purposes for reading (e.g., to understand, interpret, enjoy, solve problems, predict outcomes, answer a specific question, form an opinion, skim for facts; to discover models for own writing)

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Uses a variety of strategies to extend reading vocabulary (e.g., uses definition, restatement, example, comparison and contrast to verify word meanings)

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Uses phonetic and structural analysis techniques, syntactic structure, and semantic context to decode unknown words (e.g., vowel patterns, complex word families, syllabication, root words, affixes)

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Use a variety of context clues to decode unknown words (e.g., draws on earlier reading, reads ahead)

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Uses word reference materials (e.g., glossary, dictionary, thesaurus) to determine the meaning and pronunciation, of unknown words
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Makes, confirms, and revises simple predictions about what will be found in a text (e.g., uses prior knowledge and ideas presented in text, illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues)
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Uses specific strategies to clear up confusing parts of a text (e.g., pauses, rereads the text, consults another source, represents abstract information as mental pictures, draws upon background knowledge, asks for help)
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Reflects on what has been learned after reading and formulates ideas, opinions, and personal responses to texts
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Writing
Prewriting: Uses a variety of prewriting strategies (e.g., makes outlines, uses published pieces as writing models, constructs critical standards, brainstorms, builds background knowledge)
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Drafting and Revising: Uses a variety of strategies to draft and revise written work (e.g., analyzes and clarifies meaning, makes structural and syntactical changes, uses an organizational scheme, uses sensory words and figurative language, rethinks and rewrites for different audiences and purposes, checks for a consistent point of view and for transitions between paragraphs, uses direct feedback to revise compositions)
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Editing and Publishing: Uses a variety of strategies to edit and publish written work (e.g., eliminates slang; edits for grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling at a developmentally appropriate level; proofreads using reference materials, word processor, and other resources; edits for clarity, word choice, and language usage; uses a word processor or other technology to publish written work)

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Uses content, style, and structure (e.g., formal or informal language, genre, organization) appropriate for specific audiences (e.g., public, private) and purposes (e.g., to entertain, to influence, to inform)
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Writes expository compositions (e.g., states a thesis or purpose; presents information that reflects knowledge about the topic of the report; organizes and presents information in a logical manner, including an introduction and conclusion; uses own words to develop ideas; uses common expository structures and features, such as compare-contrast or problem-solution)
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Writes persuasive compositions (e.g., engages the reader by establishing a context, creating a persona, and otherwise developing reader interest; develops a controlling idea that conveys a judgment; creates and organizes a structure appropriate to the needs and interests of a specific audience; arranges details, reasons, examples, and/or anecdotes persuasively; excludes information and arguments that are irrelevant; anticipates and addresses reader concerns and counter arguments; supports arguments with detailed evidence, citing sources of information as appropriate)
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Writes compositions that address problems/solutions (e.g., identifies and defines a
problem in a way appropriate to the intended audience, describes at least one solution,
presents logical and well-supported reasons)
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Gathering And Using Information For Research Purposes
Gathers data for research topics from interviews (e.g., prepares and asks relevant questions, makes notes of responses, compiles responses)
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Determines the appropriateness of an information source for a research topic
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Organizes information and ideas from multiple sources in systematic ways (e.g., time lines, outlines, notes, graphic representations)
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Writes research papers (e.g., separates information into major components based on a set of criteria, examines critical relationships between and among elements of a research topic, addresses different perspectives on a topic, achieves balance between research information and original ideas, integrates a variety of information into a whole, draws conclusions)
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Uses appropriate methods to cite and document reference sources (e.g., footnotes, bibliography)
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